World-famous boxer Floyd Mayweather will release his blockchain non-fungible tokens (NFTs) later this month.

These NFTs will feature animations, artwork, and memorabilia involving his life career, as well as memorabilia from his personal keepsakes.

The reversal of the Chicago River is a famously metaphoric moment in the control of nature. The capture of the Mississippi River, so perfectly captured in John McPhee’s long piece “Atchafalaya” in his book The Control of Nature, may be the most physically ambitious. But for my money, no effort to manipulate our most important elemental force is weirder, more interesting, more unsettling, or seemingly more what the future feels like than the Everglades.

It’s a genuinely thoughtful way of undoing a half-century of damage. It’s a massively complicated and multidisciplinary scientific effort that’s possibly our most robust application of climate modeling in the U.S., if not the world, those datasets that are mostly in the news as their ticker tapes spit out apocalpyses. It’s sort of metaphorical, beating plowshares — the infrastructure that destroyed the Glades — back into tools to save it, not perfectly, but impressively, given the scale of the work and the limitations to it.

At the same time, don’t get me wrong, it sucks. We’re faking an impossibly subtle and fragile ecosystem with a computer system, literally the “Natural System Model.” Calling it a kludge would be a disrespect to the mortals who have put it together, but to a watchmaker god it would, yeah, be a kludge.

Image caption. The pessimistic type who doesn’t think we’re going to start hitting climate targets anytime soon, the future looks like Southern Florida.

And if you’re the pessimistic type who doesn’t think we’re going to start hitting climate targets anytime soon, the future looks like Southern Florida. Which if you’re an American, you basically knew.

The reversal of the Chicago River is a famously metaphoric moment in the control of nature. The capture of the Mississippi River, so perfectly captured in John McPhee’s long piece “Atchafalaya” in his book The Control of Nature, may be the most physically ambitious. But for my money, no effort to manipulate our most important elemental force is weirder, more interesting, more unsettling, or seemingly more what the future feels like than the Everglades.

It’s a genuinely thoughtful way of undoing a half-century of damage. It’s a massively complicated and multidisciplinary scientific effort that’s possibly our most robust application of climate modeling in the U.S., if not the world, those datasets that are mostly in the news as their ticker tapes spit out apocalpyses. It’s sort of metaphorical, beating plowshares — the infrastructure that destroyed the Glades — back into tools to save it, not perfectly, but impressively, given the scale of the work and the limitations to it.

At the same time, don’t get me wrong, it sucks. We’re faking an impossibly subtle and fragile ecosystem with a computer system, literally the “Natural System Model.” Calling it a kludge would be a disrespect to the mortals who have put it together, but to a watchmaker god it would, yeah, be a kludge.

And if you’re the pessimistic type who doesn’t think we’re going to start hitting climate targets anytime soon, the future looks like Southern Florida. Which if you’re an American, you basically knew.

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